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Solution Name:​​ Metacognitive Training​​ 

SKU:​​ MCSTAOTST

Solution Plan: ​​ 

 

Metacognitive skills training (MST) is a cognitive rehabilitation approach that aims to facilitate the development of self-awareness in adults.

Metacognition, or thinking about one’s thinking, is key to facilitating lasting learning experiences and developing lifelong learners. Linda Darling-Hammond and her colleagues (2003) identify two types of metacognition: reflection, or “thinking about what we know,” and self-regulation, or “managing how we go about learning."

Activities for Metacognition

  • Identify what they already know.

  • Articulate what​​ was​​ learned.

  • Communicate knowledge, skills, and abilities to a specific audience

  • Set goals and monitor progress.

  • Evaluate and revise own work.

  • Identify and implement effective learning strategies.

  • Facilitate equal participation

  • Ensure​​ the adults​​ do most of the talking

  • Take place before, during, and after an experience

  • Happen in different group configurations (individuals, pairs, small group, large group)

Examples of metacognitive activities include:

  • planning how to approach a task​​ 

  • using appropriate skills and strategies to solve a problem,

  • monitoring one’s own comprehension of text,

  • self-assessing and self-correcting in response to self-assessment

  • ​​ evaluating progress toward the completion of a task​​ 

  • becoming aware of distracting stimuli.

Fogarty (1994) suggests that Metacognition is a process that spans three distinct phases, and that, to be successful thinkers, must do the following:​​ 

  • Develop a​​ plan​​ before approaching a learning task, such as reading for comprehension or solving a math problem.​​ – ask the question:​​ What am I supposed to learn?

  • Monitor​​ their understanding; use “fix-up” strategies when meaning breaks down.​​ -ask the questions:​​ How am I doing? Am I on the right track?

  • Evaluate​​ thinking after completing the task-ask the questions:​​ How well did I do? What did I learn? Did I get the results I expected?

Required Materials:​​ 

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